Design Enhancement for Low Profile Fan Powered Units

Design Enhancement for Low Profile Fan Powered Units – 37S and 37SST

A design enhancement of the Low Profile Fan Powered Terminal Unit Series 37S and 37SST, improves performance on Unit Sizes 1 – 3, allowing for larger fan airflow capacities.  The Unit Size 3 airflow range is increased by 300 cfm and is now between 440 cfm and 1250 cfm.  A Unit Size 2 with ECM is now added to our selections, for when a more intermediate airflow range is required.

The new design is in effect from May 30, 2017, and we recommend that you review the performance pages and the Selectworks program for more information.

If you are curious to see the design enhancement, please view below video for a demonstration.

New – Nailor Wood Grain Finishes

From Nailor Industries:

At Nailor, we thrive on customer satisfaction, offering our clients new products and solutions in order to provide a competitive advantage in the industry. We are now pleased to be able to offer architectural “Woodgrain finishes” on several steel and aluminum products as an alternative to conventional paint color finishes, allowing us the opportunity to integrate high-end, visually-appealing products into today’s built environment. Woodgrain offers a cosmetically-appealing, environmentally-friendly solution for many Nailor Air Distribution products such as 39VH Series Vertical Hi-Rise Fan Coil Units, 41VX Series Exposed Cabinet Vertical Floor Fan Coil Units, Architectural UNI Plaque Ceiling Diffusers, 4900 Series Linear Bar Grilles, 5000 Series Slot Diffusers, Flowline, Displacement and UFAD Diffusers.

Click here for more information: Woodgrain Finish

New “Stealth” Silencer

New “Stealth” Induced Air Dissipative Silencer for 33SZ Series Fan Powered Chilled Water Terminal Units

Unique to Nailor, the “Stealth” Induced Air Dissipative Silencer option provides maximum acoustic attenuation by reducing radiated sound power levels. The medium insertion loss design does not however affect fan performance.  When units are installed above the occupied space, the addition of the silencer reduces the radiated sound level in the occupied space by a significant 5 NC. It is available as standard with Fiberglass Media. A Mylar/Spacer Liner option is also available for IAQ sensitive applications. The optional induced air inlet accessory is shipped loose for field attachment.

Interested in more information on this product, email us.

Sensor Calibration

Sensor Calibration – Accurate Sensors Require Calibration:

Sensor Calibration

According to an article in the January 2016 ASHRAE Journal, Applying Demand Control Ventilation, “CO2 sensors are subject to calibration drift and accuracy issues over time. A field study on a campus building with CO2-based DCV found that differences between the commercial CO2 sensors used in buildings are significant. Periodic maintenance is essential to keep the readings of CO2 concentration accurate over time.”

At Aircuity, we couldn’t agree more and our bi-annual sensor exchange is a core element of our solution’s long-term accuracy. The Calibration Laboratory at our headquarters calibrates over 6,000 sensors annually. A team of 6 calibration technicians follow a regimented calibration process, which with a calibration verification phase when sensors are run for 1 to 5 days to eliminate programming or out of box failures. The newly calibrated sensors are shipped to Aircuity-certified technicians around the world who install them at local customers’ facilities.

Our sensor calibration process means fewer headaches for customers and a solution that building occupants and constituents can count on!

Need your sensors calibrated? email us.

Read the full ASHRAE article: Applying Demand Control Ventilation

3D Renderings by Nailor

3D Renderings by Nailor IndustriesNailor-3d

Using the latest technology, we are able to produce a high-resolution 3D rendering creating a virtual showcase of Nailor’s product offerings. This experience recreates the real-life movement and capabilities along with displaying high-fidelity texture and details.

Please let us know If there is a product offering that you would like to see.

New Vendor website – Nailor

Nailor Industries
New Vendor website – NailorNailor Industries, Inc. is excited to announce the release of our new website, optimized for desktop, tablet, and smartphone!  www.nailor.com

3 simple ways to locate Nailor products:

  1. Products:  Drill down to reach your desired product by filtering through various categories.
  2. Knowledge Center:  See all drawings by Drawing Type arranged by Model Series.
  3. Product/Model Search:  An auto-complete search feature for all Products and Models.
Enhancements include:

1.  When viewed in Chrome, 3D views of numerous models are
available
(updated regularly!):
1600 Series Extruded Aluminum Louvers
All models
1700 Series Formed Steel Louvers
1704D, 1706D, 1704AD
Ceiling Diffusers:
UNI, RUNI, 66UNI, 7500, 6500, TWR, RNS, RNS3, 4330

2. Knowledge Center features ALL Nailor Literature:
Product Overview Brochures, Product Flyers, Product Spotlights,
Ad Slicks & more!
3. Rep Locator:
All new interactive Rep Locator – click the Map or use
the search box!
4. Nailor Airwaves, Social Media & Nailor Newsletter!
Find the Nailor Airwaves blog under the Corporate tab,
follow us on Social Media, and sign-up for our new
Email Newsletter.
As always, your comments and feedback are greatly appreciated!marketing@nailor.com

Thank you,

Nailor Industries, Inc.

Room Manager Sales Release

Single Point Integration/Vantage System Management

Room Manager Sales Release

Facility staffs have increasingly diverse needs affecting their choice of a BMS to their preference for specific protocols to use. IT departments play a more prevalent role in the decision making process since they are mandated to ensure any solution deployed meets strict cyber security requirements. Flexible integration architecture is a necessity when integrating room controls to front-end systems.

To address the resulting complexity of these requirements, Phoenix Controls developed Vantage Room Manager. This software package meets customer’s varying needs while rounding out your Vantage system integration product portfolio. When deployed with Room Integrators or Room Controllers, Room Manager provides Vantage system-wide management features and a single IP network configuration that functionally replaces MacroServers.

Feature Highlights

  • Functionally replaces MacroServer to support single IP integration requirements to BMS.
  • Consolidates all Room Integrator (RMI) and Room Controller (RMC) databases into a single system database for integration to BMS.
  • When integration is implemented directly from RMIs and RMCs (distributed integration requiring multiple IP addresses provided by the site), Room Manager can be deployed to provide management functions for the devices.
  • Allows local station backups and restores for RMIs and RMCs.
  • Room Manager is software only and can be installed on any computer or virtual machine that your end user prefers, as long as it meets the minimum specifications listed on the data sheet.

For important information about availability, ordering, pricing, and licensing, read the full Sales Bulletin on the Partner website.

New EZvav Digital Controls

ezdigital

The new EZvav Digital Controls by Nailor bring simplicity to the Variable Air Volume (VAV) terminal unit market. Designed for both stand-alone applications and for integration with BACnet building automation systems, EZvav are precise P+I pressure independent VAV controllers that are pre-configured for standard control sequences that cover the vast majority of terminal unit applications.

All terminal units with electric or hot water heating coils are supplied as standard with a DAT Discharge Air Temperature control sensor that can limit the discharge air temperature to a maximum of 15°F above room set point, helping compliance with ASHRAE Standard 62.1 and 55. Field commissioning and balancing can all be performed using the standard digital display room temperature sensor, which has an intuitive menu driven setup. No laptop, expansion modules, communication interface or software is required.

FEATURES & BENEFITS:

  • Integrated controller/actuator/transducervavezdigital
  • Factory mounted and wired for new building applications
  • Ideal for retrofitting and upgrading pneumatic and analog controls to a digital solution
  • Room temperature sensor (thermostat) options include Digital Display, Occupancy Sensor and compact Rotary Dial models
  • Remote fan volume adjustment from 0 – 100% for EPIC ECM fan powered terminals
  • Simple menu driven setup
  • BACnet BMS network integration ready

Application Control Sequences Include:

  • Single Duct VAV or CAV Cooling only and Heat/Cool Changeover
  • Single Duct VAV Cooling with reheat
  • Dual Duct Variable Volume or Constant Volume control
  • Series Fan Powered Constant Volume with/without supplementary heat
  • Parallel Fan Powered Variable Volume with/without supplementary heat

Heating Control Options:

Binary (up to 3 stages of electric heat), Modulating (0 – 10 Vdc analog) or Floating heat control.

Native BACnet

All models are BACnet Applications Specific Controllers that are ready to connect to a BACnet MS/TP network.  Device instance, MAC address and baud rate are set from an STE-8001W36 without special software.

EZ to order

Nailor Representatives’ Automated Pricing Program (RAPP) features EZ quick select options for control sequences and room temperature sensor options based on terminal unit type and application requirement.

EZ to install

For field retrofit applications, the EZvav controller is mounted within a terminal unit controls enclosure and directly coupled to the damper shaft. The flow sensor, power supply, heat and temperature sensors are then connected. The EZvav controller automatically detects them without programming or software tools.

EZ to setup, commission and balance

All options can be set by using an STE-8001W36 sensor as a technician’s service tool or installed as a permanent room sensor. The EZvav Controller can be stocked by representatives to provide a simple digital solution to their customers that wish to upgrade their pneumatic or analog inventory to a new digital solution, perfect for retrofit applications!

For the full product brochure please click here.

Case Study – Providence Regional Medical Center

Case Study – Providence Regional Medical Center

Background
Providence Regional Medical Center’s 10-story, 730,000 square foot Cymbaluk Medical Tower opened in June 2011; completed at a total cost of $500 million. Although opened in 2011, the planning and design for the facility occurred much earlier. After the engineering plans were complete and the building materials necessary to start construction using a CV system purchased, the new facility director asked “Why are we running a Constant Volume system if VAV is allowed?”

PRMC

The Situation
Reasonable payback time and long-term savings had to justify changing the HVAC system in a construction project already underway. Cdi, the project’s mechanical engineers, showed that switching to a Phoenix Controls VAV design offered a tremendous opportunity for cost savings while providing the accuracy and repeatability required to maintain a safe and healthy environment. VAV energy efficiency also qualified for utility incentives that offset costs and reduced the payback period.

The Solution
Providence Everett facilities and CDi Engineers decided to use Phoenix Controls VAV tracking pair valves in each patient room. Phoenix Controls venturi valves’ accuracy and turndown capabilities enabled significant energy savings while providing the precision airflow control required in high consequence spaces. The tracking pair system also enabled easy transitioning to a pandemic ready facility if needed.

The Result

Analysis showed that switching to VAV would save an estimated 7,560,000 Kwh per year in energy. Additional utilities rebates available for energy conservation exceeded $1,400,000. Cumulative rewards for switching to VAV reduced the payback period for the entire project from 4.6 years to 3.16 years. The long-term benefits from creating a more adaptable facility with built in energy savings greatly exceeded original project goals. ​​​​​​​​​

For the full pdf case study please click here.

New 92FFD – Fan Filter Diffusers

New 92FFD – Fan Filter Diffusers

Nailor – New 92FFD – Fan Filter Diffusers are fan powered diffusers with integrated high efficiency filters for critical environment applications. The diffusers are designed to 92FFDsupply HEPA/ULPA filtered air to a critical environment and are intended for use in cleanroom applications such as microelectronics, pharmaceutical, biotechnology as well as aerospace manufacturing/assembly and laser/optic industries.

Filters are secured within the plenum against a continuous knife edge. The knife edge contacts the gel channel of the filter to provide a leak proof seal. Filters are room-side removable via quarter turn fasteners. All 92FFD Series Plenums are robotically 95FFD-dwgwelded to ensure a consistent, rigid, clean and relatively leak free design to verify the specified efficiency and leakage to meet the most stringent of current leakage tests. Each unit is PAO Scan Tested to IEST-RP-CC034.3 Standard to ensure leakage is
consistent with an uncompromised filter. Premium design features and high quality construction include a removable face for
room-side filter replacement. This enables the integrity of the clean space to be maintained as the ceiling does not need to be penetrated.

Standard ECM technology provides an ultra-energy efficient design with the ability to precisely set a constant air volume. Additionally, as filter loading increases fan external static pressure, the ECM will compensate to maintain set airflow.

Click here for the full product overview –  Nailor Fan Filter Unit

 

Case Study – Plattsburgh

Case Study – Plattsburgh

Aircuity helps to reduce energy, create a healthier environment and reduce deferred maintenance.

The State University of New York at Plattsburgh is a four-year institution located in northern New York and is a part of the State University of New York (SUNY) system. CS-Platt1Currently a big focus of all SUNY locations and SUNY System Administration is to meet Build Smart NY’s executive Order 88. The Governor’s Order mandates a 20 percent improvement in the energy efficiency performance of State government buildings by April 2020. Lab buildings are typically the most energy intensive spaces on campus and the university needed a way to address the energy use in these spaces, while still maintaining a healthy facility for occupants.

Hudson Hall on the SUNY Plattsburgh campus is one of two main science buildings. Local Aircuity representative, Green Building Partners, identi­fied Hudson Hall as a great application for the solution and it was installed in all lab areas of the building. With Aircuity’s implementation, air change rates were reduced from 6 (with a few spaces at 7) to a baseline of 3 and 4 ACH, increas­ing when additional fresh air is needed.

BENEFITS BEYOND ENERGY SAVINGS Once installed the university was able to realize additional benefits beyond the significant energy savings. Optimizing ventilation through Aircuity also addressed an issue with moisture in the labs. Originally the chillers in the building were not keeping up with the cooling requirements, which in turn was causing a moisture issue with the mi­croscopes. With the ventilation rates matching the current needs of the space and generally less air to cool, SUNY Plattsburgh’s EH&S department confirmed that the problem was eliminated.
Aircuity’s solution also helped to reduce the uni­versity’s deferred maintenance backlog by identify­ing several faulty controllers in the building. After the installation was complete Aircuity Advisor™ Services identified several rooms where CFMs were still not reporting as low as initially targeted.

CS-Platt2

By tracking the CFM levels in each of these rooms through Aircuity Advisor Services, three broken actuators were discovered and then repaired. Now these rooms are hitting their targets.

CS-Platt3

Two additional rooms are being tracked to further reduce CFM levels by carefully monitoring the fume hood sash positions.

“I met Gordon Sharp (Aircuity’s founder) at a local ASHRAE meeting back late 2013 where he present­ed a talk on “Deep Energy Reductions in Labs”, said Crystal Price, sustainability coordinator, SUNY Plattsburgh. “Seeing that he had been recently pub­lished in the ASHRAE handbook chapter for labora­tories, I was excited at the possibility of utilizing this concept to both achieve energy savings and solve a humidity problem in our lab building. We are happy with the results.”

The energy reduction in Hudson Hall grabbed the attention of the New York State Energy Manager (NYEM), who took note of the reduction in the building at the meter level. Currently the building is being considered for an energy efficiency award. The installation of Aircuity in the lab areas is just one example of the significant role an airside solution can play in helping to achieve important energy goals. SUNY Plattsburgh was able to save energy in one of its most energy intensive and criti­cal safety environments on campus, while receiving better indoor environmental quality and reducing deferred maintenance along the way.

ABOUT SUNY AT PLATTSBURGH

SUNY Plattsburgh (www.plattsburgh.edu) was founded in 1889 as a teaching college and in 1948 became an original member of the State University of New York (SUNY). Under President John Ettling, the four-year comprehensive college now serves 5,500 undergraduates and 500 graduate students. It offers more than 60 majors and a wide range of special programs that prepare graduates for professional life and advanced studies through a strong foundation in liberal arts and an experience that celebrates excellence, ethical values, lifelong learning and responsible citizenship in a global community. Situated near Lake Champlain, the Adirondacks, and Canada, the college’s unique location provides rich recreational, cultural and educational opportunities. Today, SUNY Platts­burgh is a thriving campus that has experienced significant growth in student applications, has been recognized two years in a row by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine as one of the “Top 100 Values in Public Colleges,” for its mix of academic quality, financial aid, opportunities and total cost.

ABOUT AIRCUITY Aircuity is the smart airside efficiency company providing building owners with sustained energy savings through its intelligent measurement solu­tions. By combining real-time sensing and continuous analysis of indoor environments, the company has helped commercial, institutional and lab building owners lower operating costs, improve safety and become more energy efficient. Founded in 2000 and headquartered in Newton, MA, Aircuity’s solutions have benefitted organizations such as the University of Pennsylvania, Eli Lilly, Masdar City, the Bank of America Tower and the University of California-Irvine.

For additional information on this case study and how you could save your facility please contact us.

Case Study – Arizona State Univ

Case Study – Arizona State University’s Airside Efficiency Program

ASUAs a founding member of the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, Arizona State University’s (ASU) president committed to becoming carbon neutral by 2025. The university launched a campus-wide carbon reduction initiative and identified buildings, for their large amount of energy consumption as an important part of their plan.

One obvious area of focus for energy reduction was on research  and laboratory facilities  including the 350,000 sqft, LEED Platinum, Biodesign Institute. After evaluating several measures, ASU selected Aircuity. The solution was implemented through out the building and saved the university $1,000,000 annually.

“Aircuity has been a critical part of helping Arizona State University move forward with its energy conservation initiatives and show real emission reductions,” said Mike McLeod, Director of Facilities at the Biodesign Institute “Their technology allowed us to make a real difference and see efficiency improvements right away.”
After the resounding success of the Biodesign Institute, ASU went on to install Aircuity in 24 buildings across campus to date. These spaces include additional science facilities, a student center, library, classroom buildings, and an arena.

ASU is a great example of the wide range of buildings on a campus that can benefit from an airside program. Our customers have told us that implementing a program is a smart investment. Beyond the significant energy savings, an airside efficiency program also reduces the deferred maintenance backlog, validates M&V, reduce operations spend, enhances indoor environmental quality and delivers an information layer for continuous commissioning.

For additional information on this case study and how you could save your facility please contact us.

Net-Zero Energy Usage

Achieving Near Net-Zero Energy Usage in Laboratory Facilities

Planning Requires a Holistic Approach to Energy-Saving Technologies

Take airflow, for example. Because airflow is the biggest driver of energy usage in labs, airflow reduction is the key to savings. Utilizing energy models is important, though, since low-flow design can lessen the effects of other energy-saving concepts, says Gordon Sharp, chairman and founder of Aircuity, Inc.

Achieving net-zero energy for a laboratory building alone (where all necessary power is generated on the building itself) is difficult, adds Sharp, because the typical energy output from solar panel technology is only 10 to 20 kWh per sf, and the minimum energy consumption for most labs is 15 to 40 kWh per sf. But achieving net-zero for an entire site is possible by reducing the lab’s energy usage in conjunction with generating energy with photo-voltaics elsewhere on site.

“Net-zero is challenging for a lab, because of the square footage involved and the amount of power density. The problem, or maybe the opportunity, is if we work well with the lab, we can probably get energy usage down low enough that, technically, it is a net-zero lab. However, to have all the solar photovoltaics on the building itself, it would have to be either one story or only a few floors with a lot of office and non-lab spaces, as well.”

Focus on Designs that Maximize Savings

Energy and cost savings can be maximized in lab settings by focusing on a few targeted, high-impact concepts, says Sharp.

“You can get the bulk of the savings with a few ideas versus trying to do 20 different things, each generating 2 percent savings.”

Sharp’s company developed an energy analysis tool that holistically evaluates a lab’s needs and focuses on its unique requirements. The majority of a lab’s energy is used for heating/cooling outside air, so available tools that focused on building envelopes weren’t effective. Aircuity’s model calculates probable energy and upfront costs, taking into account the proposed design and outside climate, and how various energy-saving approaches would work within those parameters.

“All these technologies interact, and if you look at each product separately, that doesn’t account for the interaction and often adds up to more cost than energy savings,” he says. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed interest in using this analysis tool, which has already been accepted by utility companies and others.

In conjunction with the analysis, Sharp recommends a pyramid approach to modeling energy systems. The systems with the most impact form the foundation, or pyramid base. The ascending layers play increasingly lesser roles in energy savings. The five levels, starting with the base, are:

  • Variable air volume (VAV), or basic airflow control approaches
  • Demand-based control and fume hood minimums
  • Low pressure drop design and VAV exit velocity flow
  • Chilled beams
  • Heat recovery

“To optimize lab safety, first cost, and energy, combine systems based on analysis of net benefits,” he advises.

The Pyramid Approach

To begin reducing lab airflow, says Sharp, look at the three main factors that impact it:prym

  • Makeup air for exhaust devices, such as fume hoods, biosafety cabinets, and animal cage racks
  • Thermal loads
  • Air changes per hour (ACH) ventilation dilution rates.

Whichever factor is highest will dictate the lab airflow, says Sharp. Reductions in one area do not necessarily affect overall energy consumption. For example, to save on thermal energy, a lab can use more efficient freezers, but doing so could increase HVAC energy, because those freezers were generating heat and possibly reducing reheat costs.

“While it’s good to get more efficient freezers, you then have to reduce your airflow in these areas, or it’s not going to generate as much HVAC energy savings as you might think. Look at all these requirements and reduce each one.”

There are various means to reduce airflow from fume hoods, including high-performance devices such as low face velocity hoods and filter or ductless hoods. Encouraging good sash-closing habits helps, or use automatic sash-closing technology.

For labs with a moderate to high density of hoods, new ANSI Z9.5 minimum fume hood airflow requirements promote significant energy savings, says Sharp. The new recommended range allows for as low as 100 cfm for a 6-foot hood when the sash is closed. For extremely high-density labs, such as six to eight hoods in 1,000 sf, keeping the sashes down and using low fume hood airflow minimums is probably the only way to reduce airflow, adds Sharp.

Typical thermal loads for labs are 2.5 to 3 watts per sf, which would require less than four ACH during the day to cool the room, he adds. Reducing the ACH in a lab environment to two to four during the day and two at night is an achievable goal. If high thermal loads are the culprit, using chilled beams or hydronic cooling to decouple the airflow from the actual thermal loads is beneficial, he adds.

Demand-based control is one of the best ways to lower ACH in the lab room. A system of centralized sensors monitors the indoor environment for contaminants about once every 15 minutes. If the air is clean, the airflow minimum is reduced to as low as two ACH; when air contaminants are sensed, the airflow is increased to eight to 16 ACH.

“When air contaminants are sensed, we want to ‘purge’ the lab or go to a higher airflow,” notes Sharp. “But 98 percent of the time the lab air is clean, and a low ventilation rate can be used.”

Sharp’s company has done more than 500 projects with the demand-based control concept, and this approach is even referenced in the ASHRAE HVAC Applications handbook.

“This performance-based approach to airflow control within labs creates a dramatic reduction in the airflow and the energy required to operate a laboratory. When you do that, you can reduce capital cost, as well, because less airflow capacity and HVAC equipment are required.”

Variable exhaust fan exit velocity control also can lower airflow. Typically, exhaust fans run at a constant flow with a high exit velocity, so exhaust air doesn’t flow back into the building or into other buildings nearby. A damper adds roof air to the exhaust when this airflow drops in order to maintain constant flow. To save energy, one or more manifold fans can be staged, or sequentially turned off, as the building airflow is reduced. However, even staged exhaust fans can consume more than two times the energy of exhaust fans operating in variable air volume or VAV mode, says Sharp.

When wind speed is low enough and coming from the right direction, the exhaust discharge velocity can be reduced without increasing its reentry into the building. A wind responsive exhaust fan control system uses anemometers, controls, and a table determined by wind tunnel testing to reduce the exhaust fan airflow under certain wind speed and direction conditions.

A demand-based approach that measures the contaminants in the exhaust air can save even more energy, says Sharp. When the exhaust air is clean or has a low contaminant level, the airflow can be reduced while limiting reentry to safe levels. When contaminants are detected, the exhaust fan flow is increased. For most labs, the exhaust air is clean 98 percent of the time.

Another approach is low-pressure-drop design. Typical HVAC designs might have a combined exhaust and supply pressure drop of about 10 inches, whereas good design can achieve 6.5 inches, says Sharp. “If you really work at it, you might be able to get to a design as low as 4 inches of total supply and exhaust. The energy savings of this design is similar in magnitude to the exhaust fan control approach.”

Combining Systems

Chilled beams are higher on the pyramid because, although they are a great energy-saving concept, they work most effectively when coupled with reduced airflow and demand-based control, says Sharp. Cooling requirements in most labs are low, so beams placed in a lab with six to eight ACH won’t get used often, because the necessary cooling comes from the airflow itself.

If a demand-based approach can be used to reduce outside airflow requirements for dilution ventilation, then chilled beams can decouple the outside air and supply airflow requirements. When the lab’s cooling requirements exceed the cooling provided by the two to four ACHs in demand-based control, then the chilled beams will take care of additional cooling requirements.

“The best approach is, reduce the outside air and let the beams do their job.”

This also enables a downsizing of the HVAC system, because its use is based on the ventilation requirements of the lab, which are going to be low most of the time, adds Sharp. The combination of chilled beams and demand-based control results in lower HVAC system upfront costs. These savings are usually higher than those realized from conventional VAV control or chilled beams alone, he notes.

Heat recovery is at the top of the pyramid because for all but extremely cold or extremely hot and humid climates, it often provides less savings, says Sharp, especially compared with reducing airflow.

An enthalpy wheel provides the most effective and efficient means to recover and transfer thermal-related energy and humidity-related energy. This large, porous wheel rotates through the exhaust airflow stream on one side and the fresh air stream on the other, swapping the airstreams and transferring moisture and temperature in the process. Since a small amount of contaminants carries over from the exhaust to the supply airstream, these wheels should be used only with airflows that are strictly room exhaust, with no fume hood exhaust.

Runaround loops—two linked coils filled with a heat-conduction liquid such as glycol—can be used to safely transfer sensible energy or thermal energy only from the fume hood exhaust to the supply air. They can be effective in cold climates but don’t offer as much savings in more temperate or warm and humid climates, and in some cases can increase costs, says Sharp.

“It is important to remember that these coils cause a significant pressure drop, and you have to pay for that pressure drop in energy. This energy cost reduces the total thermal savings, so the result in some cases can actually be a net increase in total energy used.

“If you’re going to use heat recovery, take maximum advantage of its ability to reduce the chiller and heating system peak load requirements by downsizing your HVAC system, because that’s where significant benefits and payback potential exist.”

Enthalpy wheels offer more payback in cold and dry climates or very humid environments, whereas runaround loop systems are best applied in colder environments, where there is more heat energy to be recovered.

“It is also important to remember that if variable air volume and demand-based systems are used to cut the airflow rates significantly, there’s less for the heat recovery systems to do. That’s part of the reason the savings may not be as not as much as expected,” says Sharp. “On the other hand, reducing the lab airflows can potentially reduce the heat recovery systems’ size, which will partially improve payback.”

Energy Savings in Action: Case Studies

These energy-saving technologies and philosophies work well even in extreme climates, says Sharp. One example is the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST) in Abu Dhabi, where temperatures can get up to 120 degrees with high humidity. The project consisted of two buildings totaling 1.5 million sf, about 250,000 nsf of which is lab space. Their goal was to build sustainable but also economically viable facilities without spending millions.

Using the energy analysis tool, Sharp looked at how much the energy costs would be for a smaller lab project of about 125,000 gsf, with 50,000 nsf of lab space and 30,000 nsf office space—about one-fifth of the total project. Factoring in a conservative minimum ACH baseline of six, local energy costs, a low to moderate density of hoods, and the Abu Dhabi climate, he concluded that baseline energy usage would be $600,000 for that portion, or $3 million total annually. Cooling costs constituted 60 percent of the total energy use.

The analysis showed that combining several high-impact approaches could achieve a 74 percent energy savings. Demand-based control reduced airflow to two ACH minimum day and night when the lab air was clean, and up to 14 ACH when contaminants were detected. Fume hoods were operated with automatic sash closers and airflow minimums at 100 cfm, or 150 hood ACH when the sash is closed. Chilled beams, some aspects of low pressure-drop design, and an enthalpy wheel were also employed, says Sharp. Demand-based control alone reduced lab HVAC energy costs by $322,000 annually, or 53 percent. The system paid for itself in 1.4 years, he adds.

typThe HVAC system capacity also was reduced significantly for MIST, resulting in upfront cost savings. Even more importantly, the lower energy requirements reduced the size of the photo-voltaics needed to run the buildings and achieved a near net-zero result for the site. The demand-based control, even with the impact of the other energy savings approaches, saved about 9,000 megawatt hours for the whole project, or about four megawatts of solar capacity—roughly $20 million of first cost, according to Sharp.

This same project in a climate like Boston’s generates a slightly higher reduction in energy—77 percent. The use of demand-based control and a reduction of minimum ACH levels from six to four (when occupied) and two (when unoccupied) achieved a 13 percent reduction in peak HVAC airflow, for an HVAC capital cost savings of $280,000 annually. If chilled beams, a VAV exhaust system, and heat recovery are used along with a demand-based control system operating at two ACH minimum day and night, then the initial cost of the HVAC system, chilled beams, and heat recovery can be reduced by $850,000. Even with the cost of the demand-based control system, this approach generates a first cost reduction of $386,000, notes Sharp

A Paradigm Shift

Low airflow lab design represents a paradigm shift, but the savings are so significant and easily achievable, it should be used as the foundation for efficiency, believes Sharp.

Utilizing these savings measures also allows for more open and flexible lab designs, because you are creating an environment more akin to an office than a lab. And the low airflow designs can be adapted to work in any climate.

“The bottom line is: Do your analysis, make sure each energy-saving concept makes sense for your situation, and then apply it appropriately.”

By Taitia Shelow

This report is based on a presentation Sharp made at Tradeline’s 2014 International Conference on Research Facilities.

source: https://www.tradelineinc.com/reports/2015-3/achieving-near-net-zero-energy-usage-laboratory-facilities

Fan Coil Unit Design

Best Practices in Fan Coil Unit Design

Doing things because “That is the way we always did it” does not make it the right way. Using new technologies is how humankind progresses. Doing it the old way 41Vewould bring us back to carrying people in litters rather than using wheels. Certainly it would be simpler and more economical to build litters than automobiles and jets.

The technology behind the controls sequence is not new. It is used on large equipment every day. Every day, we design buildings with air handlers that are designed to be used in VAV applications. This is for the purpose of saving energy and investment money by using smaller equipment to satisfy only the simultaneous building load rather than the total building peak load. This allows us to take advantage of building diversity and save money both in first cost and in operating costs. What is new is that the ECM motor gives us the opportunity to improve the old way.

The old-style fan coil units using PSC motors cause the hotel to be conditioned with equipment sized for the total load; however, the room very rarely sees total load conditions. Having on/off control with 3-speed motors and 2-position valves does not allow the fan coils to address part load conditions. This new design allows for the room equipment (the fan coils) to address not only full load conditions, but also part load conditions where the room lives at least 85% of the year. The new design will meet the building design requirements under all operating conditions.

Once the ECM motor was available, equipment could be designed that would take advantage of the calculated load in the space. And because the motor efficiency 41Vcand blower efficiency both increase as the motor rpm and airflow are decreased, the owner or user pays lower utility bills while the equipment provides a superior environment and lower sound levels.

Forward looking companies should require that new technologies be used when available and when they can improve the building so that their clientele, the occupants, are able to take advantage of lower energy costs, improved IAQ and lower sound levels. ECM motors and dynamic fan and valve control designed to regulate discharge air temperature certainly meet that criteria.

Energy in the Lab

lab0904

Energy demand and utility costs in laboratory buildings are very high — they can require 5-10 times more energy per square foot than a typical commercial office building. Given all the scientific equipment and technology found in modern research labs, this isn’t hard to imagine. Laboratories are so energy intensive for a number of reasons, spanning far beyond lab equipment, each with a variety of energy savings opportunities. We’re taking a look at a few of the reasons why labs require so much energy to operate and what is being done to advance laboratory energy efficiency.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

In many lab buildings, HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) systems make up the majority of the building’s energy demand. Because a safe research lab environment needs clean air, lab building ventilation rates are particularly high, sometimes up to 12 Air Changes per Hour (ACH). This means that in each hour, the entire volume of air in the lab is completely replenished with clean air 12 times. Depending on how sophisticated the HVAC controls are, as well as the occupant work schedule of the lab, facility managers can program the building’s HVAC system to operate at the minimum rate (four ACH) when the building is unoccupied, and raise it to the needed ventilation rate when the building is in use. More advanced HVAC control systems can adjust ventilation rates based on indoor air quality using real-time, zone level data. This means that ventilation rates can increase when contaminants are detected in the air, and decrease when the indoor air quality is high. This can significantly reduce energy consumption while still maintaining a safe work environment at all times. When considering retrofit and retrocommissioning options in a lab building, financial decision makers should first start with HVAC systems for a cost effective energy efficiency upgrade.

Fume Hoods

As another example of energy use in lab buildings, lab fume hoods can consume as much energy as two to three homes in the US. If you aren’t familiar with this widely used technology, a fume hood is a ventilation device that protects lab workers from breathing in volatile chemicals by drawing in air from the lab space and pushing the air outside the building. The number of fume hoods in a lab affects the utility costs of the building significantly. With fairly simple behavioral changes, like using a sash (a moveable shield at the opening of the fume hood) when the fume hood is not in use, energy can be saved in two ways. First, less conditioned air is pumped out of the room, reducing the demand on the lab’s HVAC. Second, with Variable Air Volume (VAV) fume hoods, shutting the sash will reduce the rate of exhaust air flow to maintain the minimum ventilation rate. This reduces energy consumption, as well as upholds a safer work environment for occupants. As a result, it would be wise for labs to adopt this practice as policy, as well as engage lab workers to shut the sash when the fume hood is not in use.

PowerSave Campus

The Alliance to Save Energy’s PowerSave Campus program has implemented several fume hood energy competitions resulting in huge energy savings. Currently, a “shut the sash” competition is being held at UC San Francisco, where after just one month of outreach to around 40 lab employees using 22 fume hoods, annual savings are projected to reach approximately 148,000 kWh and $19,000. To help ensure long term energy saving practices continue, frequent reminders through visual cues and other outreach techniques will be implemented after the competition is over.

Additional Strategies

According to Allison Paradise, executive director of My Green Lab, one of the most important energy saving strategies that is often overlooked is occupant behavior change, especially in labs that have already implemented energy efficiency measures. In addition to shutting the sash on fume hoods, a few easy strategies that can reduce the operational costs of a lab include:  turning off the lights at the end of the day, utilizing task lighting, unplugging lab equipment and using appliance timers. Switching an Ultra-Low Temperature Freezer used to store samples from -80 degrees Celsius to -70 degrees Celsius can potentially reduce the freezer’s energy consumption by 30 percent. This can save the lab a substantial amount of money and can be done without the risk of damaging most samples.

Even with an abundance of energy savings opportunities, promoting behavior change in research labs can be challenging. In an atmosphere where scientific research always takes priority, saving energy is not something most lab workers often think about. Moreover, if behavior change means altering something that could, in some conceivable way, negatively affect research, it often ends the discussion prematurely. That’s why it’s up to building facilities managers, EH&S, energy efficiency professionals and energy conscious building occupants to communicate how energy efficient behavior practices can be done safely and with minimal effort.

 

New 41V Series – Fan Coil Units

New 41V Series – FAN COIL UNITS (ENGINEERED COMFORT BRAND)

Coming Soon…

41VIdeal for use in hospitality, condominiums and an excellent retrofit choice; the 41V Series will initially be available in concealed and exposed chassis. The exposed chassis will offer both a traditional and sloped top arrangement.

Features include:

  • PSC and 3-speed ECM
  • Two or four pipe hydronic connections
  • Electric heat
  • MERV 8 or 13 pleated filter options
  • Multiple mounting options
  • Airflow ranges from 200 – 1200 cfm* [*motor and type dependent]
  • Factory supplied piping packages.

 

Concealed:

  • Discharge flange for grille or ducted connections41Vc
  • Slim profile design; less than 10″ (254) deep in most cases
  • Easily accessible internal components
  • Optional decorative wall panel

 

 

 

Exposed:

  • 41VeConstructed of heavy gauge steel
  • One piece front panel assembly provides easy access to internal components
  • Standard supply air is delivered through a stamped louvered face; double deflection and linear bar grilles are optional
  • Assortment of fasteners, including 1/4 turn or tamper-proof available.

 

Stock Catalog Updated

Stock Catalog Updated

Metropolitan Equipment Group, Inc has recently updated our stock catalog.  Please click below to download the latest version, or check out our warehouse section for additional information.

000-MEG_Cover_3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Products:
– 5010 & 5075 Lay-In Linear Slot Diffusers
– 5875I Plenum Slot Diffusers
– Stainless Steel Quick Release Clamps
– 24″ Dia Spiral Duct

For up-to-date warehouse pricing please email us.

 

Mechanical & Energy Conference

Big Ten & Friends
Mechanical & Energy Conference
September 20 – 23, 2015

Welcome to the University of Maryland, the location of the 2015 Big Ten & Friends Mechanical & Energy Conference. This year’s conference will be held September 20 – 23, 2015 at the College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center and we look forward to your participation.

The Big Ten & Friends Mechanical & Energy Conference will bring together facility owners, operators, engineers and professionals in higher education and business partners to network, listen to, and take back information to continually improve the sustainability and efficiency of campus and university infrastructure. Mechanical infrastructure and operation directly impact facilities’ energy and carbon footprint. This year’s conference hopes to blend industry developments and practices to improve energy consumption, ultimately and potentially reducing carbon footprint while meeting ever-increasing demands for resiliency, reliability, comfort, and indoor air quality. Methods of monitoring, measurement, and control allow for facilities personnel to meet these needs.

The University of Maryland is located just outside the Nation’s Capital, Washington, DC. The College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, located within the 1856 Land Grant Institution, is within walking distance of the University grounds and facilities.

We truly hope you will be able to join us for both an enjoyable & educational experience.

Click here for UMD Press release

Lab Energy Demand

Energy demand and utility costs in laboratory buildings are very high — they can require 5-10 times more energy per square foot than a typical commercial office building. Given all the scientific equipment and technology found in modern research labs, this isn’t hard to imagine. Laboratories are so energy intensive for a number of reasons, spanning far beyond lab equipment, each with a variety of energy savings opportunities. We’re taking a look at a few of the reasons why labs require so much energy to operate and what is being done to advance laboratory energy efficiency.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

In many lab buildings, HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) systems make up the majority of the building’s energy demand. Because a safe research lab environment needs clean air, lab building ventilation rates are particularly high, sometimesHigher Ed Teachng Lab up to 12 Air Changes per Hour (ACH). This means that in each hour, the entire volume of air in the lab is completely replenished with clean air 12 times. Depending on how sophisticated the HVAC controls are, as well as the occupant work schedule of the lab, facility managers can program the building’s HVAC system to operate at the minimum rate (four ACH) when the building is unoccupied, and raise it to the needed ventilation rate when the building is in use. More advanced HVAC control systems can adjust ventilation rates based on indoor air quality using real-time, zone level data. This means that ventilation rates can increase when contaminants are detected in the air, and decrease when the indoor air quality is high. This can significantly reduce energy consumption while still maintaining a safe work environment at all times. When considering retrofit and retrocommissioning options in a lab building, financial decision makers should first start with HVAC systems for a cost effective energy efficiency upgrade.

Fume Hoods

As another example of energy use in lab buildings, lab fume hoods can consume as much energy as two to three homes in the US. If you aren’t familiar with this widely used technology, a fume hood is a ventilation device that protects lab workers from breathing in volatile chemicals by drawing in air from the lab space and pushing the air outside the building. The number of fume hoods in a lab affects the utility costs of the building significantly. With fairly simple behavioral changes, like using a sash (a moveable shield at the opening of the fume hood) when the fume hood is not in use, energy can be saved in two ways. First, less conditioned air is pumped out of the room, reducing the demand on the lab’s HVAC. Second, with Variable Air Volume (VAV) fume hoods, shutting the sash will reduce the rate of exhaust air flow to maintain the minimum ventilation rate. This reduces energy consumption, as well as upholds a safer work environment for occupants. As a result, it would be wise for labs to adopt this practice as policy, as well as engage lab workers to shut the sash when the fume hood is not in use.

PowerSave Campus

The Alliance to Save Energy’s PowerSave Campus program has implemented several fume hood energy competitions resulting in huge energy savings. Currently, a “shut the sash” competition is being held at UC San Francisco, where after just one month of outreach to around 40 lab employees using 22 fume hoods, annual savings are projected to reach approximately 148,000 kWh and $19,000. To help ensure long term energy saving practices continue, frequent reminders through visual cues and other outreach techniques will be implemented after the competition is over.

Additional Strategies

According to Allison Paradise, executive director of My Green Lab, one of the most important energy saving strategies that is often overlooked is occupant behavior change, especially in labs that have already implemented energy efficiency measures. In addition to shutting the sash on fume hoods, a few easy strategies that can reduce the operational costs of a lab include:  turning off the lights at the end of the day, utilizing task lighting, unplugging lab equipment and using appliance timers. Switching an Ultra-Low Temperature Freezer used to store samples from -80 degrees Celsius to -70 degrees Celsius can potentially reduce the freezer’s energy consumption by 30 percent. This can save the lab a substantial amount of money and can be done without the risk of damaging most samples.

Even with an abundance of energy savings opportunities, promoting behavior change in research labs can be challenging. In an atmosphere where scientific research always takes priority, saving energy is not something most lab workers often think about. Moreover, if behavior change means altering something that could, in some conceivable way, negatively affect research, it often ends the discussion prematurely. That’s why it’s up to building facilities managers, EH&S, energy efficiency professionals and energy conscious building occupants to communicate how energy efficient behavior practices can be done safely and with minimal effort.

Recommission Labs

Recommission or Retro-Commission (RCx) – No news, doesn’t mean good news!

Many rschenvirtimes we simply respond to complaints and when there aren’t any, we assume the system is working properly.   Based on our extensive experience in engineering, servicing, commissioning and re-commissioning labs, we know that serious operational problems affecting airflow, safety and energy efficiency can be present even though occupants are not complaining.    Whether your laboratory is relatively new or decades old, a periodic review of your airflow control systems is essential to maintaining the energy savings and safety of the system.    Metropolitan Equipment Group will take the time to understand your needs and develop a plan with the entire team to recommission the system to realize the energy savings potential and bring safety back to the forefront.

As laboratory buildings grow more complex and more highly tailored, the controls necessary to protect the health and safety of the occupants also become increasingly complicated. This is particularly true in an academic setting where labs are highly customized.

Recommissioning (RCx) has become an increasingly common process for laboratory air flow systems.  While recognizing the increased complexity and interdependency of systems, at the end of the day, the relationship between the laboratory controls and the building automation system is what helps to maintain containment and user safety within these laboratories.

Even if your laboratory was commissioned when it was originally built (many were not), it has likely changed over time to meet changing needs. The addition or removal of fume hoods, snorkels, walls or partitions will change the airflow requirements of a laboratory. Additionally, if equipment is overridden or disabled by occupants (not uncommon) or by component failure, laboratory performance will be affected, even if things seem to be working properly.

Annual life_science_facifume hood re-certification isn’t enough.  Though fume hood re-certification is important, it doesn’t provide the complete inspection, testing and verification of your laboratory airflow control system and comprehensive documentation of results and recommendations that RCx does. It also doesn’t identify energy saving opportunities that, when implemented, typically save our clients 15-20% a year in energy costs.

Our team is geared to enhance safety and comfort while achieving energy savings.   Labs that are  properly recommissioned will offer comfortable, safe environments that increases productivity while eliminating smells and sounds that threaten occupant safety and productivity.

Energy Savings with Aircuity CO2+

Drive Reliable Energy Savings in Commercial Buildings with Aircuity CO2+

Did you know HVAC costs in commercial buildings represent 1/3 of the total energy use? Aircuity CO2+ is an exciting new addition to the market place as it delivers reliable CO2 demand control ventilation (DCV) to reduce energy use, enhance the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) for occupants and provide insightful data on building ventilation performance.

Aircuity CO2+ offers:

  • Accurate CO2 measurement for the life of the building
  • Maintained energy savings
  • Comprehensive reporting on IEQ conditions
  • Zero maintenance requirements for building staff
  • All system maintenance performed in utility area of building
  • Single point of digital integration for any size building

The majority of building ventilation systems run at constant levels, regardless of the actual occupancy at any given time. Vacant conference rooms, offices or classrooms are typically overventilated, but when these spaces are fully occupied they quickly become underventilated, leading to uncomfortable, unhappy occupants and lower productivity. Adjusting ventilation rates to match these changing conditions allows for energy savings and a better IEQ.

Aircuity is the most reliable method of DCV, specifically designed to overcome the deficiencies of discrete sensing systems. Discrete sensors become inaccurate over time, typically reporting CO2 levels higher than actual conditions, which will cause the building to become overventilated again, eliminating energy savings. Trying to calibrate and replace a large number of discrete sensors on a regular basis is difficult and results in higher life cycle costs. Aircuity’s remote sampling, centralized sensing architecture significantly reduces the number of sensors and utilizes a unique differential measurement approach to ensure accurate and reliable measurements of IEQ parameters for superior DCV. Aircuity takes air samples from variable occupancy spaces throughout a building and routes these back to a centralized sensing suite (SST). With just a few sensors centrally located, Aircuity is able to provide a maintenance program that assures proper system functionality by replacing sensors every six months with factory calibrated sensors.

In addition to offering reliable DCV, the newly designed system architecture allows for a cost-effective approach. The new SST550 utilizes Alternating Limb™ functionality, which significantly increases the number of areas sampled, when systems are configured in a “balanced” manner as shown below.

Alternating Limb System Architecture: CO2 Application

Aircuity-CO2+-photo

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When considering life cycle costs such as annual calibration, sensor replacement and estimated 5 year operating and maintenance costs, Aircuity’s CO2 DCV solution costs significantly less (see table). This new product makes it possible for customers to have it all—and makes Aircuity CO2+ the right choice for nearly any CO2 monitoring project.

How much less is Aircuity compared to discrete sensing?
Aircuity-CO2+-chart

 

 

 

 

For more information on implementing Aircuity’s solution in your building please contact your local Aircuity representative http://www.aircuity.com/about-us/sales-channel/

Kitchen Grease Exhaust

Case Study – Baptist Health Lexington:

About the Customer
Baptist Health Lexington (known for many years as Central Baptist Hospital), is a 383 bed tertiary care facility located in Lexington, Kentucky.  Established in 1954, Baptist Health is renowned for its regional leading cancer care as well as its Heart Institute. Since the first baby was delivered there 2 hours after the hospital opened in 1954, Baptist Health has been known as the “baby” hospital in Central Kentucky, delivering over 4000 babies annually.

Problem
In the mid-2000’s, Baptist Health built an 8-story addition to the hospital to house their new Heart Institute as well as outpatient services and medical offices. Before the addition to the building (which raised the existing structure from 3 stories to 8 stories), grease exhausted from the existing cafeteria was simply exhausted above the 3-story structure. Now, with the five additional stories, this same exhaust was being carried by prevailing winds into the new taller structure causing odor issues as well as potential sanitary issues in the new addition as fresh air intakes were built into the façade of the new building facing the kitchen exhaust.

Solution
Three Strobic Air Tri-Stack® fans, specially designed to handle kitchen grease exhaust, were installed. Applying the Tri-Stack’s® proven technology to both dilute and prevent re-entrainment of the exhaust fumes, Strobic Air designed a high temperature variant of the Tri-Stack® that incorporates the  use of all steel construction, high temperature coating (rated to 1000° F), and sloped plenum floor with grease trap. These added features allow the Strobic Air Tri-Stack® Exhaust Systems to meet the following standards:

• Independently tested and certified to meet UL 762 Standard for Power Roof Ventilators for Restaurant Exhaust Appliances.
• Designed to meet NFPA 96 Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations.

Results
Thanks to the installation of the Strobic Air Tri-Stack® fans, Baptist Health has cured their kitchen grease exhaust issue. Due to the Tri-Stack’s® ability to provide very high dilution rates, typically 300-400% for restaurant applications, combined with its ability to create and maintain virtual plume heights of 30-50 feet without tall stacks and guy wires, the grease from the hospital’s kitchen exhaust is no longer detected by the patients and staff in the new addition, nor is grease building up on the windows or façade of the new structure.

Customer Feedback
“We had used Tri-Stack® fans on traditional lab applications at the hospital so we were aware of how they worked and the quality of their construction. In this instance, with the fresh air intakes of the new building facing the kitchen, it was vitally important that we didn’t exhaust grease into sick patient rooms. We looked at several other options with our consulting engineer (Sam Claxton, CMTA), but in the end, the Strobic Air Tri-Stacks® were much more cost effective and fit our aesthetics much better than tall chimneys with stacks and guy wires.” – Bill Byrd, Director of Engineering, Baptist Health Lexington

 

For more information on Strobic Air’s Tri-Stack Fans, please click here.

New Network Integration

New Network Integration for Phoenix Controls

While ensuring your critical spaces are safe, Phoenix Control’s laboratory and healthcare airflow control systems can also provide important data to help facility owners reduce energy costs, ensure compliance to industry standards and quickly troubleshoot equipment issues. Phoenix Controls offer multiple solutions to view this information, from elegant room-level monitors to building-wide dashboard products that provide analysis of real-time data. Phoenix Controls also offers critical space integration solutions that provide a cost effective path to getting the data required into your building management system (BMS).

Network Integration

Phoenix Controls offers critical space integration solutions for integrating to legacy BMS. Highlights include:

  • Choice of centralized or distributed architecture
  • Support for multiple integration protocols including BACnet over IP or BACnet MS/TP
  • Web pages to easily monitor the health or diagnose any problems from your valve control systems using a standard browser
  • Optional I/O modules for integrating third party devices into one room level solution
  • Standard web-based Test and Balance tool for use by balancers

Room Integrator

The Phoenix Controls Room Integrator is a flexible integration solution that seamlessly integrates laboratory and healthcare airflow control devices to building automation networks. The Room Integrator’s primary purpose is providing the protocol translation and HVAC data integration between the company’s environmental control systems to BACnet®-capable Building Automation Systems (BAS). The integrator performs bidirectional translation between room-level devices using the LonWorks® technology and the BAS utilizing either BACnet over IP or MS/TP to manage read requests and write commands.

Room Controller

The Phoenix Controls Room Controller is a multi-purpose solution seamlessly integrating laboratory and healthcare airflow control devices to building automation networks while providing a platform for custom control logic. It performs:

  • Protocol translation and data integration between the company’s environmental control systems to BACnet®-capable Building Automation Systems (BAS).
  • Bidirectional translation between room-level devices using LonWorks® technology and the BAS utilizing either BACnet over IP or MS/TP to manage read requests and write commands.

The Room Controller offers a graphical programming environment and configurable inputs and outputs to extend control functions provided by on-site valve controllers. Using optional 16- or 34-point I/O modules, or via a wide range of field busses, it can also be used to provide local control for hard-wired third party devices: typically room-level lighting control, advanced temperature control sequences, or integrating air quality sensors to the building’s front-end visualization system.

Room Manager

Phoenix Controls Room Manager software is used to centrally manage your Room Integrator and Room Controller integration devices. It includes the Phoenix Controls Workbench configuration software to install and commission new devices. Room Manager can be used as centralized integration point for all installed Phoenix Control devices when a minimal number of IP addresses are required. The software also includes a web server and serves web pages indicating the health of all devices as well as diagnostic tools to trouble shoot any room network or device problems. Room Manager can be easily upgraded to a Phoenix Control Supervisor to provide a complete airflow control system solution that includes front end dashboards, data trending, airflow analytics and alarm management.

Aircuity CO2+

Introduction
We would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to Aircuity CO2+, our new solution for CO2 based DCV applications. Aircuity CO2+ offers a cost-effective and easier to implement solution for buildings where CO2 is the primary driver of ventilation requirements. Imagine almost two times (2X) the coverage per Sensor Suite at 20-30% lower cost as compared to today’s offering. This translates not only to significant first-cost savings, but also to a reduction of the on-going costs of maintaining the energy savings entitlement through OAS and Advisor services.

Better cost efficiency is achieved via new system components, which have been optimized specifically around CO2 sensing requirements, thus doubling the capacity of our system. Additionally, OptiNet® now incorporates pre-programmed DCV logic to support a wide range of applications, from DCV applications involving individual zones to that of large-scale multi-zone systems. Having this logic ‘built in’ helps to minimize the project’s dependency on the BAS vendor programming of a DCV sequence, thereby ensuring a better quality solution that’s easier and less costly to implement.

Included in this package are:

  • Guidelines to help estimate a job
  • Preliminary pricing
  • Draft Product Data Sheets, Guide Spec and Sequence of Operations to include with submittals
  • A draft of the Office Building DCV Applications Primer, which will be incorporated into the Engineering Guide Detailed pricing and specific layout recommendations will follow.

Background
While the existing Aircuity solution for CO2 based DCV control has better long-term reliability and stability and lower life cycle costs than an approach using discrete sensors, our higher first cost sometimes discourages owners from choosing Aircuity. With Aircuity CO2+ owners will see a substantial improvement in both first and life cycle costs, resulting in a more competitive solution.

Aircuity CO2+ is more competitive: Using a solutions-based value pricing approach you can expect to achieve 20-30% cost savings on both first-cost and on-going services compared to our previous non-lab solution. This significant value improvement will make us more competitive in the larger, straight CO2 DCV market with a solution that is easier to implement.

Aircuity CO2+ provides increased coverage: Optimizing the layout and leveraging Alternating Limb™ sequencing can almost double the number of sensed locations per SST. In a highly optimized layout you can expect to support up to 60 Test Areas per SST. Greater density allows you to optimize ventilation across a larger footprint without adding another SST.

Aircuity CO2+ will deliver vastly improved performance: New application functionality provides the configurability and embedded logic to reset VAV boxes serving both individual spaces and multiple spaces while factoring in outside air fraction and reset of the outside air damper to achieve the most efficient ventilation scheme. The Primer provides details including a sequence of operations for the many different ways this powerful capability can be applied.

What does this mean for you?
Release to Spec means that the design and internal testing is complete, manufacturing processes are in place, and pilot production quantities have been built and verified. So why isn’t this a full “Sales Release”? We are completing field testing, evaluating the results of the installation, start-up and run-time performance, and making final adjustments to the tools, products and processes. Once complete AIRCUITY CO2+ will be confirmed as “Release to Ship”.

The goal of “Release to Spec” is to provide you the information you need to initiate the sales cycle as soon as possible so we can both realize revenue opportunities sooner. We plan to “Release to Ship” by Q4 of this year.

For additional information please email us.